Welcome

to pigsaspets.org

NAPPA’s Hope for Hooves Project

2022

A Guide for Foster Pig Parents

This guide is designed to provide foster parents with a comprehensive overview of the NAPPA’s Hope for Hooves Project. Along with information included in the foster pig packet, the guide is meant to be helpful resource for foster parents and should answer many of the questions that may arise before and during foster care. All information is subject to change. A second chance is sometimes all we need. The same goes for pet pigs hoping to find a new loving home. There are plenty of pigs longing for a new life and welcoming owners, so before you buy we should remember that many of the sweetest and loving pigs are found in local rescues and should be considered as your next foster pig. Our mission is to create the safety net these potbellied and miniature pigs need so desperately.

Reason to Foster

Thank you for opening your heart and home to a homeless pig. Your generosity will provide young, old, injured and abused and under socialized pigs a chance to grow or heal before finding their forever home. Our hope for placing homeless pigs will save many pigs other wised homeless. The Hope for Hooves Project plays an integral part in facilitating adoption of many pigs into forever homes. Fostering is a wonderful experience for you and your family. You can feel good knowing you have helped enrich a pig’s life. Even better, you’ve created space in the rescue to accommodate other homeless pigs. Foster pigs provide hope. Your act of kindness is repaid in rewards that are beyond words.

How long are pigs in foster homes?

It depends on the pig and situation. The average stay in a foster home is about 1-2 years. However, pigs recovering from an injury and seniors may stay much longer.

Can I adopt my foster pig?

YES! Foster parents have first choice to adopt their foster pig.

If I have my own animals, can I foster?

Yes, but keep in mind that it’s always a risk to expose your established animal to a foster pig due to being prey and not adjusting to their surroundings.

What supplies are needed to foster?

Foster parents provide space, basic training, exercise, and love for the pig. Hope for Hooves will provide food for the foster pig and give contact information on partnered veterinarians, vet access and list of veterinarian colleges. We proudly have a sponsor to give feed to your foster pig. Always provide plenty of clean fresh water!

Do I have to crate-train my foster pig?

Yes, it is one of the most efficient ways to house train a foster pig. Some pigs need to be trained to walk into a crate. This is relatively easy to accomplish by putting a small amount of treats into crate. When the pig walks into the crate, then secure the door behind them. Crates should never be used as punishment.

Stay calm, be patient and read about the 3-3-3 Rule

The 3 day, 3 week, 3 months Rule: In the first days, your foster pig will be overwhelmed with their new surroundings. Let them walk up to you as they may be scared and unsure of what is going on. After 3 weeks ,your foster pig will be settling in, feeling more comfortable, and realizing this will be their safe home awaiting for their forever home. They have figured out their environment and have established a routine that you have set. Behavior issues may start showing, this is your time to be a strong leader and calmly show them what is right from wrong. After 3 months, your foster pig is now completely comfortable in their home. You have built trust and true bond with your foster pig, which gives them a complete sense of security with you. The 3-3-3 Rule is a general guide. Every pig is unique and will adjust differently. Give your foster pig space and allow them to go at his own pace.

How much time each day is needed to foster?

Commitment and responsibilities are requirement for fostering a pig. It is essential that foster parents understand that a pig may be stressed and even emotional post transport from the rescue to the foster home. Foster parents must be willing to be patent and commit to the pig because our goal is to keep them in a stable and consistent environment. Create a routine that you set from day one.

Transporting your Foster Pig

The safest way to transport your pig is in a secure crate in the back of a SUV. The crate should be secured so that it doesn’t tip over.

Harness Training

Harness training should not be attempted until your pig trusts you and is totally comfortable being touched all over. During your touching sessions, try taking measurements of your pig’s neck and girth with a cloth tape. This will be helpful when adjusting the harness (off the pig) before the initial fitting. Take your time and be patient. Rub the harness on the pig’s body. Let your pig sniff and root the harness. This is called desensitization.

Training Tip

We suggest positive, rewards based training for pigs. Increasing your foster pig’s basic-training skills has many benefits. Not only will the future adopter appreciate these skills, but your foster pig will have better manners when visiting a vet and you will have a much happier foster experience. Some basic training cues that your foster pig should learn are: Sit, Come and Crate. These are very helpful in managing any pig. Your foster pig should be allowed to root in the soil and graze on the grass (not treated with chemicals or fertilizers). Pigs are susceptible to selenium deficiency. If pigs are allowed to graze and root in the soil they will get enough. Do not feed dog or cat food (it is too high in protein). Never feed salty snacks. Never feed any pork or pork products. Give plenty of fresh water, do not give in to begging.

Help us Legalize Miniature Pigs as Pets!

Who We Are

Pigs as Pets is all volunteers. We are dedicated to serving the people and pet pigs as a pet in the United States. Pigs as Pets vision is…… The primary objectives and purpose of PAP shall be: To provide advocacy , action, and necessary support towards attaining the best quality for pigs as pets, to supply education about the pig as pets to current pig owners, prospective pig owners, the general public, and community partners, to give back to the needs of the community through services provided by PAP and collaborations with PAP, with the best practices in pig husbandry such as behavior, housing requirements, feed recommendations, seeking veterinary care, and to continuously enhance the support to meet these objectives and purposes.

What We Do

We work around the country to help protect pigs as pets, we are in collaborating with Pet Advocacy Network and a vast coalition of others to ensure that animal welfare legislation is put into place throughout the country. States to contact for statewide support as a bill allowing pigs as a pet: Alabama Alaska Arizona – contact first Arkansas California- contact last Connecticut Delaware Florida Idaho- contact second Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada- contact third New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington D.C Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Our goal is to reclassify pigs as pets from livestock to companion animals in states that don’t recognize them as pets. The importance of allowing pet pigs as pets: Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs are native to Southeast Asia and since 1985 have been imported into the United States as pets. They are highly intelligent, social and playful who require mental stimulation and an appropriate living environment for optimal well-being. Municipal zoning laws were usually created to delineate urban from rural areas to protect citizens from nuisance. They were created long before the advent of pet pig ownership in the United States and do not reflect the reality of the proliferation of companion pigs in recent years. With pig rescues at maximum capacity pet pigs are often abandoned or destroyed. It is the view of Pigs as Pets that action to create protection for pet pigs and their loving families is long overdue. The first and foremost concern should be the safety of the pet pig. A secondary concern should be the right of the pet pig owners to be secure in their ownership of their companion animal. Take action for pigs as pets in your state. Talk to your state legislators about passing laws to recognize pigs as pets and regulations to protect them! In order to address these concerns we respectfully request you contact your State Representatives with the following: • {The Ask:} Please consider supporting legislation that would allow the statewide keeping of these type of pigs as pets. • Currently, pet pigs are not considered as pets in state of XXX. An estimated amount of pigs in households in the state of XXX.

Steps to take for reclassifying pet pigs as pets:

• Please contact your State Affairs led by your state director, partnered with elected officials, law enforcements….. https://www.humanesociety.org/resources/state-affairs • Once you talk with your state director ask them to help with reclassifying pigs as pets in upcoming session. They have the ability to give you contact name of State Rep in your state to ask them to sponsor a potential bill. • Write an email message to state reps with similar message. • If you don’t choose to call your state representative – send a letter such as the following: Dear ______ , My name is XXX. I am writing on behalf of the North American Pet Pig Association (NAPPA) to consider supporting legislation that would allow the statewide keeping of Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs as a pet. Currently, Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs are not allowed as a pet in some states. The Importance of Allowing Pigs as Pets: I am writing today to ask for your support about recognizing them as a pet. Current laws treat all pigs as livestock, a situation that does not reflect the real differences between species suited for companionship and domestic residence and their much larger cousins (farm livestock). By enacting thoughtful regulations, xxx (state) can ensure that its citizens are educated and equipped to keep Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs as animal companions. I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you. Sincerely, xxxx • Many pet pig owners are forced to fight their municipal Government or surrender them to pig sanctuaries or pig rescues. • Additionally, pig rescues are inundated with full-sized Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs who have been surrendered after the owners could no longer care for them. • Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs are native to Southeast Asia and since 1985 have imported into the United States as pets. • They are highly intelligent and playful who require mental stimulation and an appropriate living environment for optimal well-being. As Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs have become widely accepted as pets, many towns, cities and municipalities throughout the United States have enacted laws to permit the keeping of Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs as miniature pigs as pets. • They have the ability to form bonds with their humans and are very affectionate and playful. Each has their own unique personalities. • They can indeed make great pets for the right people with the right expectations.

Summary:

Our goal is to reclassify Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs from livestock to companion pets and allow them to live with their families in cities and towns. The definition from zoo: These population are bred and raised under human control for many generations and are substantially altered as a group in appearance or behavior. Examples include potbellied pigs, ferrets, turkeys, canaries, domestic pigeons, budgerigars, goldfish, silkworms, dogs, cats, sheep, chickens, llamas and guinea pigs. When classified as an exotic animal many cities and towns refuse these categories and the potbellied pig ultimately end up in a sanctuary or is euthanized. Potbellied pigs and miniature pigs as pets can be a delight to have around your home. They make good pets and easy to care for as well. I would hope that everyone has educated themselves in the difference of potbellied pigs, miniature pigs and farm livestock. They are intelligent, readily trained, affectionate, curious, playful, clean, generally quiet, odor free and usually non-allergenic. Many owners consider their pigs’ an integral part of the family and involve them in all activities. The pot- bellied pigs and miniature pigs do not have sweat glands and therefore no odor. They are easily trained and housebroken like dogs and cats.
Pigs    as  Pets
BACK TO TOP FOR MORE INFORMATION, E-MAIL: nappapignews@yahoo.com 2022 Designed by: WimberlysWebWorks.com

Help us Legalize

Miniature Pigs as

Pets

CLICK HERE
click photos to enlarge
click photo to enlarge

Welcome

to pigsaspets.org

NAPPA’s Hope for Hooves Project

2022

A Guide for Foster

Pig Parents

This guide is designed to provide foster parents with a comprehensive overview of the NAPPA’s Hope for Hooves Project. Along with information included in the foster pig packet, the guide is meant to be helpful resource for foster parents and should answer many of the questions that may arise before and during foster care. All information is subject to change. A second chance is sometimes all we need. The same goes for pet pigs hoping to find a new loving home. There are plenty of pigs longing for a new life and welcoming owners, so before you buy we should remember that many of the sweetest and loving pigs are found in local rescues and should be considered as your next foster pig. Our mission is to create the safety net these potbellied and miniature pigs need so desperately.

Reason to Foster

Thank you for opening your heart and home to a homeless pig. Your generosity will provide young, old, injured and abused and under socialized pigs a chance to grow or heal before finding their forever home. Our hope for placing homeless pigs will save many pigs other wised homeless. The Hope for Hooves Project plays an integral part in facilitating adoption of many pigs into forever homes. Fostering is a wonderful experience for you and your family. You can feel good knowing you have helped enrich a pig’s life. Even better, you’ve created space in the rescue to accommodate other homeless pigs. Foster pigs provide hope. Your act of kindness is repaid in rewards that are beyond words.

How long are pigs in foster homes?

It depends on the pig and situation. The average stay in a foster home is about 1-2 years. However, pigs recovering from an injury and seniors may stay much longer.

Can I adopt my foster pig?

YES! Foster parents have first choice to adopt their foster pig.

If I have my own animals, can I foster?

Yes, but keep in mind that it’s always a risk to expose your established animal to a foster pig due to being prey and not adjusting to their surroundings.

What supplies are needed to foster?

Foster parents provide space, basic training, exercise, and love for the pig. Hope for Hooves will provide food for the foster pig and give contact information on partnered veterinarians, vet access and list of veterinarian colleges. We proudly have a sponsor to give feed to your foster pig. Always provide plenty of clean fresh water!

Do I have to crate-train my foster pig?

Yes, it is one of the most efficient ways to house train a foster pig. Some pigs need to be trained to walk into a crate. This is relatively easy to accomplish by putting a small amount of treats into crate. When the pig walks into the crate, then secure the door behind them. Crates should never be used as punishment.

Stay calm, be patient and read about

the 3-3-3 Rule

The 3 day, 3 week, 3 months Rule: In the first days, your foster pig will be overwhelmed with their new surroundings. Let them walk up to you as they may be scared and unsure of what is going on. After 3 weeks ,your foster pig will be settling in, feeling more comfortable, and realizing this will be their safe home awaiting for their forever home. They have figured out their environment and have established a routine that you have set. Behavior issues may start showing, this is your time to be a strong leader and calmly show them what is right from wrong. After 3 months, your foster pig is now completely comfortable in their home. You have built trust and true bond with your foster pig, which gives them a complete sense of security with you. The 3-3-3 Rule is a general guide. Every pig is unique and will adjust differently. Give your foster pig space and allow them to go at his own pace.

How much time each day is needed to

foster?

Commitment and responsibilities are requirement for fostering a pig. It is essential that foster parents understand that a pig may be stressed and even emotional post transport from the rescue to the foster home. Foster parents must be willing to be patent and commit to the pig because our goal is to keep them in a stable and consistent environment. Create a routine that you set from day one.

Transporting your Foster Pig

The safest way to transport your pig is in a secure crate in the back of a SUV. The crate should be secured so that it doesn’t tip over.

Harness Training

Harness training should not be attempted until your pig trusts you and is totally comfortable being touched all over. During your touching sessions, try taking measurements of your pig’s neck and girth with a cloth tape. This will be helpful when adjusting the harness (off the pig) before the initial fitting. Take your time and be patient. Rub the harness on the pig’s body. Let your pig sniff and root the harness. This is called desensitization.

Training Tip

We suggest positive, rewards based training for pigs. Increasing your foster pig’s basic-training skills has many benefits. Not only will the future adopter appreciate these skills, but your foster pig will have better manners when visiting a vet and you will have a much happier foster experience. Some basic training cues that your foster pig should learn are: Sit, Come and Crate. These are very helpful in managing any pig. Your foster pig should be allowed to root in the soil and graze on the grass (not treated with chemicals or fertilizers). Pigs are susceptible to selenium deficiency. If pigs are allowed to graze and root in the soil they will get enough. Do not feed dog or cat food (it is too high in protein). Never feed salty snacks. Never feed any pork or pork products. Give plenty of fresh water, do not give in to begging.

Help us Legalize Miniature Pigs as

Pets!

Who We Are

Pigs as Pets is all volunteers. We are dedicated to serving the people and pet pigs as a pet in the United States. Pigs as Pets vision is…… The primary objectives and purpose of PAP shall be: To provide advocacy , action, and necessary support towards attaining the best quality for pigs as pets, to supply education about the pig as pets to current pig owners, prospective pig owners, the general public, and community partners, to give back to the needs of the community through services provided by PAP and collaborations with PAP, with the best practices in pig husbandry such as behavior, housing requirements, feed recommendations, seeking veterinary care, and to continuously enhance the support to meet these objectives and purposes.

What We Do

We work around the country to help protect pigs as pets, we are in collaborating with Pet Advocacy Network and a vast coalition of others to ensure that animal welfare legislation is put into place throughout the country. States to contact for statewide support as a bill allowing pigs as a pet: Alabama Alaska Arizona – contact first Arkansas California- contact last Connecticut Delaware Florida Idaho- contact second Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada- contact third New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington D.C Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Our goal is to reclassify pigs as pets from livestock to companion animals in states that don’t recognize them as pets. The importance of allowing pet pigs as pets: Vietnamese pot- bellied pigs and miniature pigs are native to Southeast Asia and since 1985 have been imported into the United States as pets. They are highly intelligent, social and playful who require mental stimulation and an appropriate living environment for optimal well-being. Municipal zoning laws were usually created to delineate urban from rural areas to protect citizens from nuisance. They were created long before the advent of pet pig ownership in the United States and do not reflect the reality of the proliferation of companion pigs in recent years. With pig rescues at maximum capacity pet pigs are often abandoned or destroyed. It is the view of Pigs as Pets that action to create protection for pet pigs and their loving families is long overdue. The first and foremost concern should be the safety of the pet pig. A secondary concern should be the right of the pet pig owners to be secure in their ownership of their companion animal. Take action for pigs as pets in your state. Talk to your state legislators about passing laws to recognize pigs as pets and regulations to protect them! In order to address these concerns we respectfully request you contact your State Representatives with the following: • {The Ask:} Please consider supporting legislation that would allow the statewide keeping of these type of pigs as pets. • Currently, pet pigs are not considered as pets in state of XXX. An estimated amount of pigs in households in the state of XXX.

Steps to take for reclassifying pet pigs as

pets:

• Please contact your State Affairs led by your state director, partnered with elected officials, law enforcements….. https://www.humanesociety.org/resources/state -affairs • Once you talk with your state director ask them to help with reclassifying pigs as pets in upcoming session. They have the ability to give you contact name of State Rep in your state to ask them to sponsor a potential bill. • Write an email message to state reps with similar message. • If you don’t choose to call your state representative – send a letter such as the following: Dear ______ , My name is XXX. I am writing on behalf of the North American Pet Pig Association (NAPPA) to consider supporting legislation that would allow the statewide keeping of Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs as a pet. Currently, Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs are not allowed as a pet in some states. The Importance of Allowing Pigs as Pets: I am writing today to ask for your support about recognizing them as a pet. Current laws treat all pigs as livestock, a situation that does not reflect the real differences between species suited for companionship and domestic residence and their much larger cousins (farm livestock). By enacting thoughtful regulations, xxx (state) can ensure that its citizens are educated and equipped to keep Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs as animal companions. I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you. Sincerely, xxxx • Many pet pig owners are forced to fight their municipal Government or surrender them to pig sanctuaries or pig rescues. • Additionally, pig rescues are inundated with full-sized Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs who have been surrendered after the owners could no longer care for them. • Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs are native to Southeast Asia and since 1985 have imported into the United States as pets. • They are highly intelligent and playful who require mental stimulation and an appropriate living environment for optimal well-being. As Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs have become widely accepted as pets, many towns, cities and municipalities throughout the United States have enacted laws to permit the keeping of Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs as miniature pigs as pets. • They have the ability to form bonds with their humans and are very affectionate and playful. Each has their own unique personalities. • They can indeed make great pets for the right people with the right expectations.

Summary:

Our goal is to reclassify Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs from livestock to companion pets and allow them to live with their families in cities and towns. The definition from zoo: These population are bred and raised under human control for many generations and are substantially altered as a group in appearance or behavior. Examples include potbellied pigs, ferrets, turkeys, canaries, domestic pigeons, budgerigars, goldfish, silkworms, dogs, cats, sheep, chickens, llamas and guinea pigs. When classified as an exotic animal many cities and towns refuse these categories and the potbellied pig ultimately end up in a sanctuary or is euthanized. Potbellied pigs and miniature pigs as pets can be a delight to have around your home. They make good pets and easy to care for as well. I would hope that everyone has educated themselves in the difference of potbellied pigs, miniature pigs and farm livestock. They are intelligent, readily trained, affectionate, curious, playful, clean, generally quiet, odor free and usually non- allergenic. Many owners consider their pigs’ an integral part of the family and involve them in all activities. The pot-bellied pigs and miniature pigs do not have sweat glands and therefore no odor. They are easily trained and housebroken like dogs and cats.
Pigs    as  Pets
Pigs    as  Pets
BACK TO TOP FOR MORE INFORMATION, E-MAIL: nappapignews@yahoo.com 2022 Designed by: WimberlysWebWorks.com
Free Website Counter

Help us Legalize

Miniature Pigs as

Pets

CLICK HERE
click photo to enlarge
click photos to enlarge